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What Is a Stet?

Jan. 7, 2022

"Stet" is a Latin word that means "to stand still." It's usually used in legal contexts to indicate that a judge will not change a court order. The stet docket is a dormant docket, and if your case is sent to it, you are effectively dismissed from that point forward. If you are placed on the stet for a year, you or the state may recall your case at any moment during that year.

Why Is a Stet Docket Decision Made?

This decision is made when the court wants to dismiss a case without prejudice. This means that the plaintiff can come back and file the same case again at any time. It also means that the defendant isn't found guilty or innocent, and no judgment is made on the matter.

The stet docket is usually used when there's been a mistake made in the process, but the defendant has ultimately done nothing wrong.

Who Might Ask for A Stet Docket Decision?

The state or plaintiff may request that your case be sent to the stet docket in certain instances, including when they are unsure if it should go forward with prosecution because there is insufficient evidence of wrongdoing on behalf of the defendant. There must be a good faith basis for the state to make this request.

If you are placed on stet, you or your attorney can file a motion with the court to have it lifted. This must be done before the one-year anniversary of your placement on the stet docket. If the motion is granted, your case will move back to the active docket.

How Long Can a Stet Docket Last?

The stet docket lasts for one year. If the case is not recalled before that time, it will be automatically dismissed at the end of a year without prejudice to either party.

What Happens if You Are on The Stet Docket?

If your case has been sent to the stet and nothing further occurs within three years, your case will automatically be dismissed. You are dismissed from the case and can't be brought back into it.

If you are placed on stet, you or your attorney can file a motion with the court to have it lifted. This must be done before the one-year anniversary of your placement on the stet docket. If the motion is granted, your case will move back to the active docket.

What Happens if A State Moves to The Stet Docket?

If you are in a criminal matter and the prosecution requests that your charges be placed on stet, it is up to them whether or not they pursue the charges again after one year has passed from placement on this docket. In some cases, the prosecution may ask for an extension on the one-year time limit.

What Type of Cases Can a Stet Docket Decision Be Made?

A stet docket decision can be made for criminal cases or as well as civil ones. It is a way of avoiding making a determination on the outcome, and it allows both parties to avoid going through an expensive trial if they are unsure about what will happen or how much evidence there actually is against them.

How Do You Get Put on The Stet?

The court sends a notice of your criminal defense stet status to you and the prosecuting party. You may be able to get off if there is a valid reason for doing so, such as in cases where you were not aware that charges had been filed against you in the first place.

Stet Is Not a Conviction

A stet is not a conviction; it is a decision made by the court to dismiss a case without prejudice. This means that the plaintiff can come back and file the same case again at any time. It also means that the defendant isn't found guilty or innocent, and no judgment is made on the matter.

Waiving Your Right to A Speedy Trial

When you are placed on the stet docket, you waive your right to a speedy trial. This means that the state or plaintiff can take their time in deciding whether or not to pursue the case against you again. You must wait one year before filing a motion to have your case moved off of this docket.

A stet docket is a way for the court to dismiss a case without prejudice. This means that the plaintiff can come back and file the same case again at any time. It also means that the defendant isn't found guilty or innocent, and no judgment is made on the matter.